Podcast: Celebrating a COVID Christmas

We’ve made it to the end of 2020! From polarizing politics to raging fires to COVID-19, it’s been a real doozy. And now the holidays… Do we celebrate with loved ones and risk COVID or take a pass? What are the risks?

In today’s show, our guest Dr. John Grohol, founder of Psych Central, explains how this isn’t going to be our regular holiday season and that’s okay: We can easily make lemonade out of lemons.

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Guest information for ‘Dr. John Grohol- COVID Christmas’ Podcast Episode

John M. Grohol, Psy.D. is a pioneer in online mental health and psychology. Recognizing the educational and social potential of the Internet, he founded Psych Central in 1995 as one of the first mental health and psychology sites that offered information about the symptoms and treatments of mental disorders, including interactive screening quizzes and self-help tools. Dr. Grohol transformed the way people could access mental health and psychology resources online, and his leadership has helped to break down the barriers of stigma often associated with mental health concerns, bringing trusted resources and support communities to the Internet.

He has worked tirelessly as a patient advocate to improve the quality of information

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‘Nobody Sees Us’: Testing-Lab Workers Strain Under Demand

In March, April Abbott dragged a hospital bed into her office at Deaconess Hospital in Evansville, Ind. In the nine months since, she has slept in it a half-dozen times while working overnight in her clinical microbiology laboratory, where a team of some 40 scientists toils around the clock running coronavirus tests.

These all-night stints in the lab pull Dr. Abbott, the director of microbiology at Deaconess, away from her husband and three children, the oldest of whom is 8. A couple of times a week, she heads home for dinner, then drives back to work after the kids have gone to bed. She is at the lab when machines break. She is there to vet testing protocols for the lab. She is there when new testing sites open, flooding the lab with more samples to process.

“I do it because there is always more work to be done than the hours to do it in,” she said.

Nearly a year into a pandemic that has claimed more than 272,000 American lives, some 192 million tests for the coronavirus have been processed nationwide. Millions more will be needed to detect and contain the virus in the months ahead. Behind

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